OUR SPEAKERS

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Hattie Willis is an Associate Principle Rainmaking Venture Studio, an investment vehicle that partners with large corporations to de-risk the process of creating new businesses. Hattie has deep experience in entrepreneurship education, from embedding Innovation Accelerators into organizations with 14,000+ employees, to running Top 400 training for DPHL, supporting new Venture creation for Jaguar Landrover or designing culture change programs. She designed and developed Rainmaking’s Digital Learning Platform to help companies scale the skills and mindsets used by the most successful startups across established organizations to drive and democratize innovation. Hattie is also passionate about testing how startup skills can be more embedded in the impact sector.

Hattie Willis

Associate Principal
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English
Languages:
Location:
London, UK
Can also give an online talk/webinar

MY TALKS

Optimize, Grow or Catapult, Where to Target Your Organization’s Innovation Efforts

Leadership, Innovation, Entrepreneurship, Women in Tech

There are three main types of innovation: Optimize (how we execute our existing business); Grow (to new markets, or with new solutions for our existing customers); or Catapult (brand new, disruptive business models). Too often, it’s hard to know where to target your organization’s innovation efforts and each type has fundamentally different constraints, needs, tools, and metrics. This interactive session will help you understand the tools and capabilities required to effectively target your organization’s innovation efforts.

Lean, Agile and Design Thinking: Pick A Buzzword, Any Buzzword

Entrepreneurship, Innovation, UX / UI, Design, Product

Almost all large enterprises have heard of, or even parroted, the need to be “Agile”, “Lean” or “Sprint like a Startup”. Many have begun building “Design Thinking” into how they research or develop their products, and we see more “scrums” on a weekly basis in some orgs than in the Japanese World Cup. And in all this noise, it’s really, really hard to work out what’s meaningful. Where are companies even using the right word for the right methodology; let alone working to develop the principles and skills behind them at a real practitioner level.This doesn’t just affect large corporations either. Startups are bombarded with new methodologies they have to at least say they’re practicing to appease investors — but how they sort the sense from the lip service when it comes to startup skills and methodologies. We need a set of core definitions which build to a practical way to understand the interplay between these three key methodologies.

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